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Irvingia gabonensis seed oil was extracted, characterized, and used in the production of metallic soaps of calcium, magnesium, and aluminium for application as hardeners for candle wax. The percentage free fatty acid (as oleic acid) is 2.76, the acid value is 5.50, unsaponifiable matter is 0.12 and the viscosity is 205.70×102 Kgm-1S-1. The seed oil contains eight fatty acids; the most abundant being myristic acid with 54.39% followed by lauric acid with 36.83%. The percentage saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are 93.19%, 6.27% and 0.54%, respectively. The free fatty acid content of the soaps is in the order aluminium soap > magnesium soap > calcium soap. The metallic content of the soaps revealed that aluminium soap has the highest metallic content of 8.10% while that of calcium and magnesium soaps have 0.03% and 0.02% metallic contents, respectively. The melting points of the soaps prepared also followed a similar pattern. The aluminium soap exhibited mild acidic nature while calcium and magnesium soaps were basic. Although the lumens of the metallic soap candles were similar to that of local commercial candles which served as control, the candles had higher melting points and reduced burning rate. It is concluded from these that the metallic soaps make the candles harder and, longer lasting during burning and of greater value to the common user. Production of candles with metallic soaps as additives is highly advocated.

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